SMS Servers Replacing PCs in India

by mynk on Jun 02, 2008      Category: Appropriate Technology Tags: rural technology mobile sms

Amazing use of mobiles for servers when computers failed. Cutting down the cost of projects by $22,000 and making the project more effective - this weather proof solution has been a breakthrough.

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mynk's picture

mynk

Interested in the development sector and hoping to use the skills to create a positive impact......read more

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mynk's picture

Was digging info on the impact of technology and found another article on this subject

http://www.ekgaon.com/liberation_media

Mobiles are a very powerful medium and in some cases leaving computers behind! :)

Goli's picture

I liked this post and I do also think that mobile applications have a big market, because it is very easy to use. But the title of post is little confusing, because here mobiles are just enabling the communication and they have a server PC with sms gateway. I think PCs and mobiles are for different applications and Mobiles cant replace PCs nor the vice-versa.

I wonder what is happening to OLPC now, if do you get any cheap laptops for 10K and all.

parulgupta8ue's picture

Ekgaon is founded by Tapan Parikh, who won the TR35 Humanitarian of the Year award for his work on this
http://ngopost.org/story.php?title=Tapan_parikh_MIT_Technology_Reviews_T...

Currently a professor at the SIMS school at Berkeley, their group is doing some good development related research.
http://people.ischool.berkeley.edu/~parikh/

parulgupta8ue's picture

The above project (Warana unwired) is a work of the group at Microsoft research's Technology for emerging markets (TEM) group.

http://research.microsoft.com/research/tem
They are working on many interesting projects including the
http://ngopost.org/story.php?title=The_Digital_StudyHall

And Sean Blagsvedt (one of the people working on Warana Unwired) founded Babajob.com - a network to help the poor find low skilled jobs like plumbers, cook, driver etc
http://www.nytimes.com/2007/10/30/technology/30poor.html?_r=2&adxnnl=1&o...

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